SIGN IN
MEMBER AREA
Member

Grace Member Area

Log in to access exclusive member rewards, treatments of the month, access your member statements and more

CLOSE

Not a member?

Arrange a complimentary tour and join us in the Club for a juice and discover how Grace can enhance your wellbeing.

BOOK A TOUR
020 7235 8900
(0)
NEW USER

Creating an account is quick and simple and allows you to track, change or return your order.

Required field*

YOUR BAG

IS CURRENTLY EMPTY

Visit our shop to start shopping and add some items to your bag

SHOP GRACE

Grace Member Area

Log in to access exclusive member rewards, treatments of the month, access your member statements and more

Not a member?

Arrange a complimentary tour and join us in the Club for a juice and discover how Grace can enhance your wellbeing.

BOOK A TOUR

The Feeling Gut

September 29th, 2015 | Health, Lifestyle, Nutrition

by Ana Isabel, Analytical Hypnotherapist & Psychological Astrologer at Grace Belgravia.

The language we use often illustrates the connection between our feelings and our bodies. Expressions like: I feel sick to my stomach, I feel it in my guts, It’s a gut feeling, I can’t stomach it etc.  More recently , experts have been talking about a “second brain” or “little brain” in the stomach due to the network of neurons that line the stomach and the gut.  These are linked with the brain through the vagus nerves, which in turn are connected to our emotions

In the course of my work with clients, this connection becomes even more evident, as I begin working by asking them to locate a feeling in their bodies. This usually illustrates where the tension is building at a physical level.  There are three places which are commonly cited, the stomach being one of the most common.  This is not surprising given the different ways in which stress can affect us. Some people lose their appetites, others turn to food for comfort.  Some of my clients speak of indigestion when they’re upset.  In addition, there is some evidence linking irritable bowel syndrome to generalised anxiety disorder and depression.

Working as an Analytical Hypnotherapist, there are different aspects of my work which help with these issues.  One of the first things I teach my clients is relaxation. This is part of the state of Hypnosis and I encourage my clients to practice what they’re learning in our work together on a regular basis, so that they relax and learn how to calm their bodies when they are feeling tense. In addition, our work involves finding the route of the emotional issues that are troubling them. This means that as we work through these problems, their perspective begins to change, allowing them to become more confident and emotionally resilient. They find dealing with challenges that previously overwhelmed them easier. Consequently the tension that affected them at a physical level disappears.

Ultimately, working with Hypnosis as a therapy towards good emotional and physical health, illuminates how strongly and intimately the “Mind and Body” are connected.

For bookings and for more information please contact Grace Medical & Wellbeing Clinic here.